Canyon Echoes

Opening Night of The Lion King- Inside Perspective

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Opening Night of The Lion King- Inside Perspective

Charlotte Blackmon, Reporter

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The day before Lion King opened was a Wednesday, and it was a dress rehearsal day. Anxiety levels were high because of the lack of a full run, and the most nervous of all were the set crew. They hadn’t had much time to run the set changes beforehand, and there were certainly a lot of set changes.

3 hours to the show. The cast is in their 8th-period classes, waiting for the bell. Some have been biting their nails about the upcoming show all day, but some are just now realizing fully that the show is today. The final bell rings, and everyone heads to the cafeteria to get ready for the show.

2 hours to the show. People finish up their tacos from Jardin Corona and eat a quick dessert before getting into costume. From ribbon skirts to fat suits, each and every person has something to help them get into character.

1 hour to the show. The cast is running a cue-to-cue, making sure all the technical aspects are in place. Some in the cast are getting antsy, as the lead characters have not yet had their bows choreographed and most of the makeup isn’t done.

30 minutes to the show. The audience is arriving, and students rush up to the black box in costume to get their makeup done. The makeup crew isn’t there waiting. Someone has to go and get them, but once they get there, everything goes as quickly as it could.

5 minutes to the show. A prop is missing. Tech rushes around backstage, in the band hall, onstage. Someone says they saw the prop in the black box. Sure enough, there it is. It must’ve been left there when they were doing makeup.

One cast member isn’t feeling great, but the show must go on. Cast members offer support and encouragement.

The curtain opens. Everyone is in place, every prop is where it should be, all the songs and lines are memorized, and although it’s the first full run, the audience would never suspect it.

 

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